In a report published by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), 300,000 deaths from the coronavirus can be recorded this year.

A few days back the wife of American billionaire, Bill Gates predicted bloodsheds in Africa as a result of COVID-19.

Today, the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa has made another prediction in its report.

According to the reports of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, in the worst-case scenario without intervention, Africa Africa could record 3.3 million deaths and 1.2 billion infections.

According to the report, even with “intense social distancing”, Africa could still suffer more than 122 million infections.

For the institution, $ 44 billion would be needed for tests, personal protective equipment, and treatments. But in the worst case scenario, Africa would need $ 446 billion.

To ECA, Africa would need $44 billion for personal protective equipment, tests, and treatments. But $446 billion could be needed in the worst case scenario.

The new report is the most recent detailed public projection for COVID-19 deaths and infections in Africa.

This is what Vera Songwe, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations and Executive Secretary of ECA has to say:

“The economic costs of the pandemic have been greater than the direct impact of COVID19.

Across the continent, all economies are suffering from the sudden shock to the economies.

The physical distance necessary to contain the pandemic is stifling and drowning economic activity.”

“To protect and build towards the Continent’s shared prosperity, $100 billion is needed to urgently and immediately provide fiscal space to all countries to help address the immediate safety net needs of the populations,” Vera Songwe further reiterated.

The report noted that small and medium sized enterprizes in Africa risk closure if immediate action not taken to support them.

The pandemic it should be noted has affected the economy of Africa, bringing almost every activity to a standstill.

 

Kiffasblog

 

 

 

 

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