Minister Gregoire Owona tells Nathalie Yamb he is of Cameroonian nationality.

The Minister of Labor and Social Security has decided to reply Nathalie Yamb who claims to have seen him with a European passport.

Since the declaration of the non-eligibility of Hervé Emmanuel Nkom’s candidacy for the 2020 legislative elections, the debate on dual nationality has resumed in Cameroon.

The case having spilled a lot of ink and saliva, she resurrected others. It is therefore in this wake that the Swiss-Cameroonian, Nathalie Yamb on her Twitter account, made a tweet in which she indexed Grégoire

Owona.

With this tweet, she managed to cast doubt on the nationality of the Minister of Labor and Social Security (Mintss). It is therefore in response to the said tweet that the Minister wrote the following “Nathalie Yamb, the

respect that I owe you for being interested in what I said in my interview in Abidjan forces me to tell you the truth: I am of Cameroonian nationality and it is not me that you saw with… ”.

Recall that Nathalie Yamb had on her part written “I hope that you have a very good knowledge of your own nationality, Owona Grégoire? Because remember that I ran into you in a queue of passengers with a

European Union passport during a border control at the entrance of a European country “.

About Grégoire Owona

Originally from Ngomezap in the Center Province, Owona was first elected as a municipal councilor in Douala in 1987. He was then elected to the National Assembly in 1988 as a candidate for the CPDM in the Littoral

Province, and he sat at the National Assembly from 1988 to 1992; as General Rapporteur of the National Assembly, in the Finance Committee. At the time of the parliamentary elections in March 1992, Owona said

that the problem of the CPDM “lies in winning by too much margin; taking us for cheaters.” He became Deputy Secretary General of the CPDM Central Committee in July 1992. Following the presidential election of

October 1992, where President Paul Biya was re-elected. Owona was part of the delegation sent in January 1993, for the swearing in of President Bill Clinton.

By Subiru M.

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